EQ Freq Question

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Makin0
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EQ Freq Question

Post by Makin0 » Fri Jul 09, 2010 4:33 pm

i have seen many Eq tutorials but they dont explain this. Can the freq on different tracks (synth, perc..) be the same or does all need to be different? i have a lead boosted on 7k and another on 6k. and can a perc be on same freq like a synth? im guesing there is a fact about this! :?: 8O

evon
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by evon » Fri Jul 09, 2010 5:36 pm

I use the EQ to help in carving out the spaces in the soundscape for each track/instrument. Both tracks can have the same frequency if there is no other option, but there are other ways that can be used to seperate them. Panning and even different fader levels would help to seperate the tracks enough.
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Makin0
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by Makin0 » Fri Jul 09, 2010 6:18 pm

Ok thx for the help! i see in a toturial that if i boost on one instrument i must cut in the same freq in another instrument. is that right??

deanthomastunes
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by deanthomastunes » Fri Jul 09, 2010 9:39 pm

Not necessarily, but you do need to take measures to ensure the sounds do not clash and do not 'mud' the mix.

This can be done through panning, stereo separation etc. You could even sidechain the problematic frequencies.
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Z3NO
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by Z3NO » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:52 pm

no easy answer.
Some timbres sit perfectly well with others even in the same frequency range, others don't at all. Lower frequencies tend to be more problematic. Short percussive sounds can sit quite well over many things with some well placed eq and volume control. Using panning to correct problems is usually a bad idea when the material is played back live or over a mono system.

Fumato
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by Fumato » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:18 pm

Trust your ears.

The synth and perc have other frequencies present which help to distinguish them from each other. However, masking can be an issue. It's best to not have "too many" instruments all playing in the same frequency range as they can become indistinguishable.

yleh8k
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by yleh8k » Sun Jul 11, 2010 5:49 am

deanthomastunes wrote:Not necessarily, but you do need to take measures to ensure the sounds do not clash and do not 'mud' the mix.

This can be done through panning, stereo separation etc. You could even sidechain the problematic frequencies.
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topspin
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by topspin » Sun Jul 11, 2010 12:40 pm

wat dose timbre mean? ive heard it before, but dont actually know what is means.
Z3NO wrote:no easy answer.
Some timbres sit perfectly well with others even in the same frequency range, others don't at all. Lower frequencies tend to be more problematic. Short percussive sounds can sit quite well over many things with some well placed eq and volume control. Using panning to correct problems is usually a bad idea when the material is played back live or over a mono system.

Z3NO
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by Z3NO » Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:21 pm

A timbre is the characteristic of a particular sound. It's what tells you, for example, how you can distinguish the sound of a piano from that of a trumpet, even though they are playing the same note or frequency.
instruments which have similar timbres will sit well together even within the same frequency range (i.e. brass) while different timbres tend to clash...

Z3NO
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by Z3NO » Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:28 pm

yleh8k wrote:
deanthomastunes wrote:Not necessarily, but you do need to take measures to ensure the sounds do not clash and do not 'mud' the mix.

This can be done through panning, stereo separation etc. You could even sidechain the problematic frequencies.
+1
-1

While sidechaining can be a quick fix, solving problems using panning or stereo separation is often a bad idea. Those techniques should only be used creatively to add depth and dimension, as any problem 'fixed' will return as soon as the material is played back over a mono system or in a live set... or even on a system with a different stereo image from the one where the material was originally produced on.

simonlb
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by simonlb » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:20 pm

evon wrote: there are other ways that can be used to seperate them. Panning and even different fader levels would help to seperate the tracks enough.
deanthomastunes wrote:
This can be done through panning, stereo separation etc. You could even sidechain the problematic frequencies.
Nobody's mentioned arrangment yet?

A good way to stop sounds clashing is to not have them playing at the same time if they don't need to be. There's a reason the singer in a rock band shuts up for the guitar solo (similar frequency range). Modern electronic music isn't as clear-cut but you shouldn't rule out keeping the arrangement clean, it might just help your mix.

evon
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Re: EQ Freq Question

Post by evon » Wed Jul 14, 2010 3:10 pm

Nobody's mentioned arrangment yet?

A good way to stop sounds clashing is to not have them playing at the same time if they don't need to be. There's a reason the singer in a rock band shuts up for the guitar solo (similar frequency range). Modern electronic music isn't as clear-cut but you shouldn't rule out keeping the arrangement clean, it might just help your mix.
Of course, you are so correct. That is probably one of the main reasons why I love mixing, it is serious stuff. One needs to concentrate, no heavy drinking or smoking. There are so many tools available to carve out a mix. I sometimes look at mixing as baking a cake, experience dictates just how much of each ingriedient and the timing to use in putting them in. There is no gurantee that your cake will taste good. And how good it tastes sometimes depends on who is doing the baking, the frame of mind at the time (of course this affects hearing...ah mean there are so many variables!
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