Acoustically treating an odd shape room

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JMFOne
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Acoustically treating an odd shape room

Post by JMFOne » Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:08 pm

Is there any point in trying to help acoustically treat my mixing room/sitting room. I live in a tiny flat and I have to mix in the sitting room with 2 huge windows. Currently my monitors are infront of the windows which Ive read is a big no no. Is it worth me buying/making some bass traps and stuff or will it just be pointless. The room is kind of a square but some angles in it where the chimney and door come in. It also has another door leading into a small kitchen which is always open.

Im thinking about first moving the monitors to a corner and putting some bass traps opposite to catch the reflections.

The sound is all over the place and is doing my head in. What do you lot think?
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dtrue17
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Re: Acoustically treating an odd shape room

Post by dtrue17 » Wed Feb 15, 2012 6:28 pm

James Fowler wrote:I live in a tiny flat and I have to mix in the sitting room with 2 huge windows. Currently my monitors are infront of the windows which Ive read is a big no no. Is it worth me buying/making some bass traps and stuff or will it just be pointless. The room is kind of a square but some angles in it where the chimney and door come in. It also has another door leading into a small kitchen which is always open.
Weird...Your flat sounds identical to mine, and I'm having the same acoustical problems. I'm interested in what people have to say about this...
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mickybeautron
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Re: Acoustically treating an odd shape room

Post by mickybeautron » Wed Feb 15, 2012 8:15 pm

Acoustic treatment in the right places will help. 1 piece of treatment will stop 1 particular reflection, and getting rid of individual reflections/problems 1 by 1 will all add up to better and better sound, so may be worthwhile. But if for example the door is always open you are always going to be getting boomy reflections from there no matter what. That goes for all the problem areas you don't sort out. Have a look at room treatment ideas, and reflection diagrams on the hinterweb and see how you might be able to apply some of the techniques in your own room.

My room (roughly 4m x 3m) has a chimney sticking out, and a big wardrobe too, and i am over to 1 side, but ive got 4 bass traps, and some treatment stuck in the right places (and some in the wrong places due to a window etc) and the sound in my room is now stellar :)
Every little helps ;)
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Z3NO
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Re: Acoustically treating an odd shape room

Post by Z3NO » Fri Feb 17, 2012 11:12 pm

mickybeautron wrote:But if for example the door is always open you are always going to be getting boomy reflections from there no matter what.
Could you please explain to me the theory behind this phenomenon, given you don't know the position of the door in relation to the speakers and listening position?

To the OP. Before you go squandering your cash on bass traps, acoustic treatments and the such like, just try moving things to different positions, you'll be amazed at the results that can be achieved simply with correct placement.

An analogy I always use is of the guy who sets up a load of mirrors so he can watch the TV in the lounge from the kitchen. Unless this is a specific requirement, you'd always be better off sitting on the sofa.

Treating a room for incorrectly placed speakers is gonna certainly improve, but nowhere near as much as correct positioning (and listening) would do.

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