Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Discussion of music production, audio, equipment and any related topics, either with or without Ableton Live
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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by login » Mon Oct 20, 2014 8:36 pm

mholloway wrote:The quality of the AskVideo content really depends on which presenter it is. Some are good, but others literally amount to 30+ minutes of someone reading you the name of a knob and then paraphrasing a manual-type description of the parameter its connected to. No bigger picture, no understanding of underlying mechanics, just "Here's X. Now what this is, is you turn this to increase or decrease the amount of X." Thanks dude.

Hate when tutorials are like that

One presenter worth watching is Kenny Gioia at groove 3, he only has not many tutorials specific for electronic music (and he doesnt live) but he is quite good at explaining concepts, his tutorial on delay is pretty good.

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by mrdelurk » Sat Nov 08, 2014 4:51 am

There is still 10 days or so to go, but with 40+ tutorials completed so far, my first impression is:

Your remarks on Sonic Academy were spot on. I'll group Udemy into this same "guys playing school" category.

The "best of the best" tutorial of the 40 IMHO is Lynda.com's "Mixing Techniques With Waves Plugins" with Dave Darlington. (Presuming one uses Waves plugins). It's a course you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.

I'm only halfway through with all the Ableton tutorials, but Groove 3 ranks already consistently high. Their "Making Better Beats in Live 9" e.g. was an excellent resource even for a Live 8 user like me.

Finally, while the video was a bit reminiscent of Sesame Street, the PDF book version of David Gibson's Art Of Mixing kicks ass. It's another resource you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by timothyallan » Sat Nov 08, 2014 5:01 am

mrdelurk wrote:There is still 10 days or so to go, but with 40+ tutorials completed so far, my first impression is:

Your remarks on Sonic Academy were spot on. I'll group Udemy into this same "guys playing school" category.

The "best of the best" tutorial of the 40 IMHO is Lynda.com's "Mixing Techniques With Waves Plugins" with Dave Darlington. (Presuming one uses Waves plugins). It's a course you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.

I'm only halfway through with all the Ableton tutorials, but Groove 3 ranks already consistently high. Their "Making Better Beats in Live 9" e.g. was an excellent resource even for a Live 8 user like me.

Finally, while the video was a bit reminiscent of Sesame Street, the PDF book version of David Gibson's Art Of Mixing kicks ass. It's another resource you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.
That's my vid ;)

What I do is mainly stuff on the fly, explaining it as I go. Nothing shits me more than an instructor just reading from a script where he's already jotted down all the knob positions and just dials them in for you on screen. So I do the exact opposite, because I thought there'd be a few other people who thought the same thing.

In fact, in a few of my "Making X" videos I literally grab random samples and sounds at the start, with nothing planned, and do the entire video using those random samples. That way, you get to see/hear the thought process behind what I'm doing...not stuff I've laid out beforehand.

It works really well for me because my prep time is pretty much zilch for those videos hahahah :)

Martin Gifford
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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by Martin Gifford » Sat Nov 08, 2014 12:34 pm

I learnt about 20 things from this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnutzAFS ... detailpage

Ideas for breakdowns and build ups (electro house) by Tom Cosm.

He is really fast and engaging, unlike just about everyone else.

Steve Glen
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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by Steve Glen » Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:06 pm

Warp Academy was by far the best investment in time and money. I highly recommend them. :)

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by Garry Knight » Mon Nov 10, 2014 1:59 pm

On YouTube, Point Blank and Quantize are pretty good for relative newcomers to Live.
Garry Knight

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by beats me » Mon Nov 10, 2014 7:59 pm

timothyallan wrote:
mrdelurk wrote:There is still 10 days or so to go, but with 40+ tutorials completed so far, my first impression is:

Your remarks on Sonic Academy were spot on. I'll group Udemy into this same "guys playing school" category.

The "best of the best" tutorial of the 40 IMHO is Lynda.com's "Mixing Techniques With Waves Plugins" with Dave Darlington. (Presuming one uses Waves plugins). It's a course you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.

I'm only halfway through with all the Ableton tutorials, but Groove 3 ranks already consistently high. Their "Making Better Beats in Live 9" e.g. was an excellent resource even for a Live 8 user like me.

Finally, while the video was a bit reminiscent of Sesame Street, the PDF book version of David Gibson's Art Of Mixing kicks ass. It's another resource you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.
That's my vid ;)

What I do is mainly stuff on the fly, explaining it as I go. Nothing shits me more than an instructor just reading from a script where he's already jotted down all the knob positions and just dials them in for you on screen. So I do the exact opposite, because I thought there'd be a few other people who thought the same thing.

In fact, in a few of my "Making X" videos I literally grab random samples and sounds at the start, with nothing planned, and do the entire video using those random samples. That way, you get to see/hear the thought process behind what I'm doing...not stuff I've laid out beforehand.

It works really well for me because my prep time is pretty much zilch for those videos hahahah :)

And you have the balls to work on a song that actually sounds good. It’s kind of hard to get pumped when the instructor burps out something that sounds like a Casio preset from the 80’s. Yeah, I know that sound is big now, but I didn’t sign off on that and that's not the sound the instructor is aiming for either. :x

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by mrdelurk » Thu Nov 20, 2014 12:04 pm

timothyallan wrote:Nothing shits me more than an instructor just reading from a script where he's already jotted down all the knob positions and just dials them in for you on screen.
I'm fine with either way of presenting, what matters for me is the newness of the presented technique. Am I learning something new? I totally did from your course(s).

If we wanted to hold a tough Ableton trainer contest one day, we could throw out a challenge like "demonstrate Live's MIDI effects by creating a Top 40 tune with them" :mrgreen: (Just joking, just joking)

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by S4racen » Thu Nov 20, 2014 12:44 pm

Just starting the AskVideo ones....

Cheers
D

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by doghouse » Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:27 pm

I went with MacProVideo and was satisfied. I bought the videos rather than subscribe because I wanted to be able to refer back to them.

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by DangerousDave » Thu Nov 20, 2014 6:11 pm

mrdelurk wrote:
The "best of the best" tutorial of the 40 IMHO is Lynda.com's "Mixing Techniques With Waves Plugins" with Dave Darlington. (Presuming one uses Waves plugins). It's a course you can learn from at several levels, depending on your own experience.
Definitely, I watched one of his other mixing videos on Lynda and it was probably the best video tutorial I have ever seen about mixing/mastering. He is a savvy dude and his way of thinking about the mixing process is really engaging. When I saw his picture next to the video I was like "who is this old greasy slimeball and what is he going to teach me about EDM???" and then BAM. I ate my words that day.
https://soundcloud.com/unearthproductions
beats me wrote:everybody around you thinks you’re a fucking idiot.

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by S4racen » Fri Nov 21, 2014 12:36 pm

doghouse wrote:I went with MacProVideo and was satisfied. I bought the videos rather than subscribe because I wanted to be able to refer back to them.
If you want to get any more, there's a 20% discount if you go via my website, http://isotonikstudios.com/macprovideo-com/

Cheers
D

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by mrdelurk » Sun Nov 23, 2014 2:36 am

Sometimes the tutorials make me realize how different our tastes can be.

E.g., I watched a tutorial called "Mastering in the Box". Repeating story: the presenter, who is undoubtedly a seasoned professional, tweaks a parameter, then says, "as we heard, 3dB is ideal, any more is too much." And my gut response, every time is, "I only start to like it at 6dB! That's where I'd just begin to dial upward"... :-)

(It's probably the Fletcher Munson curve working in reverse, as I listen to music at lower levels than most.)
Last edited by mrdelurk on Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by Stromkraft » Sun Nov 23, 2014 4:09 am

I don't think that different companies are better than others necessarily, but rather different presenters being better. Of the few i've watched (Razor by Laurence Holcombe and Tremor by Eli Krantzberg) I found Groove3 to be quite good. However, I dunno why presenters use so uninteresting examples. It would be more interesting to hear some varied specific phrases being played while the interface is being explained. Not to mimic but to inspire and illustrate main points being said.

A few years I also watched some older on Live from Lynda I didn't care much for the content and their tone, but useful as orienting intro material I suppose.

Main mistake I think most educators do is focusing on explaining what is obvious, leaving out the work process and context. Even if everyone must choose their own methodology, it's still useful to hear about how other people work or think about working.

What I'd like to learn (and possibly pay for) is how to achieve specific sounds that I want as I find most presets to be really really bad, especially those that come with Live. Currently reading "How to make a noise" by Simon Cann to fill in some of the gaps I have in synthesis knowledge (started out as a guitarist).
Make some music!

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Re: Tutorials: what's better, AskVideo, Groove3, Lynda.com... ?

Post by login » Sun Nov 23, 2014 6:01 pm

Stromkraft wrote: What I'd like to learn (and possibly pay for) is how to achieve specific sounds that I want as I find most presets to be really really bad, especially those that come with Live. Currently reading "How to make a noise" by Simon Cann to fill in some of the gaps I have in synthesis knowledge (started out as a guitarist).

The best tutorial avaible to learn synthesis is Syntorial, much better than books that go over explaining each parameter. With syntorial you are pressed to train your ear to identify how a sound is constructed.

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