Noob Question- Decay

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Zelda123
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Oct 11, 2019 11:14 am

Noob Question- Decay

Post by Zelda123 » Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:11 am

Hey,

I'm using the following as a learning tool- https://www.attackmagazine.com/techniqu ... no-rumble/

In step 1 it mentions 'compressed 909 type kick with a prominent pitch envelope'. Could someone please explain to me what a prominent pitch envelope is?

I'm also adjusting the decay button however when changing this it doesn't seem to have any noticeable effect on the sound. Why?

Sorry for beginner noob questions,Thanks!

ShelLuser
Posts: 3863
Joined: Sun Dec 06, 2009 10:26 pm
Location: Wageningen, Netherlands

Re: Noob Question- Decay

Post by ShelLuser » Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:05 pm

Zelda123 wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:11 am
In step 1 it mentions 'compressed 909 type kick with a prominent pitch envelope'. Could someone please explain to me what a prominent pitch envelope is?
I think you should be asking them about that, not us ;)

Do you know what an envelope is? If not then I would start there instead of trying to learn how to dissect sounds, because how much good will this do you if you're not already familiar with the process to create sounds?

Anyway, several parts of a generated sound can be automated to add a bit of 'movement' into your sound. Normally every generated sound uses an envelope of some sort, the most common one being ADSR: Attack, Decay, Sustain & Release. If you have a long attack then it will take some time for your sound to grow to its full potential, so it wouldn't be really prominent. If you settle for a short attack otoh and also make sure that your decay and sustain are set you'll get a nice short full sound.

Of course they could mean something else too... See, programs like Live (and instruments like Absynth 5) allow you to do a lot more with envelope sections, including detuning and adjusting the pitch a bit. Just open a midi clip in Live and check its envelope section....

I'd go with the first example though.
With kind regards,

Peter

Using the 'Power' Trio: Live 10 Suite (+ Push & Max 8 ), Reason 10 and Maschine Mk3 (+ the ultimate Komplete 12).
Blog: SynthFan (under heavy construction!)

Zelda123
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Oct 11, 2019 11:14 am

Re: Noob Question- Decay

Post by Zelda123 » Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:50 pm

Ok thanks mate!

TLW
Posts: 334
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2018 2:37 am

Re: Noob Question- Decay

Post by TLW » Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:18 pm

In the case of the 909 - and lots of kick and tom drum synths - part of the characteristic of the sound is that the pitch changes over time. Usually by starting higher then descending.

The amount of pitch change and how long it takes is the “pitch envelope”. Snares might have a “noise envelope” which controls how much noise is added to the basic sound and when. On the synth the word “envelope” probably won’t be used, something like “bump”, “pitch” or “boom” is more likely. The original idea back when drum synths were invented was to try to emulate an acoustic bass drum, which often has a higher-pitched initial transient that is very quickly overpowered by the lower dominant frequency of the drum. Acoustic bass drum pedals also cause a “click”, often around 2-3KHz, which some drums synths, such as Vermonas’, also try to emulate.

Samplers and better equipped synths than the 808 and 909 generation allow quite extreme pitch bends and pitch-shifts to be automatically applied to sounds - to the point a kick drum might be used as a bass line.

When tuning drum synths to match a track it usually requires both the basic pitch of some drums and any pitch change while the sound is playing adjusting.
Live 10.1 Suite, M4L, 2014/15 MacBook Pro 15.3” Retina i7, OS Mojave 10.14.5. RME UFX, assorted synths, guitars and stuff.

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