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 Post subject: Setting up a subwoofer...
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 6:08 pm 

Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 83
Ok, so I recently got a sub ( Tannoy TS-8 ) and I've got a few questions about setup.

1. With the crossover switch at 150hz on the sub, should I kill everything below 150hz on my monitors so it's a clean 150 and below on the sub and 150 on up on the monitors?

2. Is it best to place the sub dead center underneath my studio desk? If not dead center, should the sub at least always be placed at ground level?

3. Currently I have the Tannoy Active nearfield monitors with the 6.5 inch woofer. Should I go with the 10 inch sub as opposed to the 8inch? Any help would be greatly appreciated! I guess I should also note that the studio is a small 10x10 room.


Any help our direction would be greatly appreciated!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:44 am 

Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2006 6:32 am
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Location: Colorado Springs, USA
Audio guys usually say.

Don't bother with a sub, unless your room is tuned(treated) well

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 2:26 am 

Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 83
Rogue Scrunt wrote:
Audio guys usually say.

Don't bother with a sub, unless your room is tuned(treated) well


Maybe I should just chuck it out the window :lol: I'm getting bass trappings and have always wanted a sub for my studio. I was just hoping maybe a few people have them in their studios and could lend some pointers.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 3:22 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 5:19 pm
Posts: 23576
Location: SF, CA
the thing with woofers is that the physical wavelength of bass is longer than higher frequencies, and it's long enough to enter the realm of physical location of your ears. Real studios will get an audio analyser and move the sub around the room and find a location where the bass is smooth throughout the room.

In a hobbyest application (or wherever you are) put it in a convenient spot, run some BASS loops through it, sit in your sweet spot and move your head around, if you hear the sub differently as you move your head then there's wave cancellation/addition around your sweetspot, move the sub and try again.

You can also get a radio shack SPL meter that will measure the sound around it that will help you judge how well the bass is behaving around your sweet spot.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:15 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 3:26 am
Posts: 300
Location: Toronto Ont. Canada
I've often been told a good relationship between sub and monitor is to go one cone size bigger on the sub, ie: 8 inch monitor, 10 inch sub.

As for cut offs between sub and monitor, I've found that a little bit of crossover between the two sounds good to me. I've noticed this after a couple of different studio setups. Like if the monitors go down to 80hz, the sub would get set to around 100hz or even 120hz. Whatever works for the room.

The easiest way to place a sub (once again, for me, in my experience) has been to put the sub in the sweet spot/captains chair and crawl around the room. Where it sounds the best down there, you place the sub.

Subs are omni-directional, meaning they radiate sound outwards in the shape of a sphere, unlike monitors that need to be 'pointed' at you for the best response. In a moderate sized room, you can place the sub front, back left or right without noticing a difference.

Something else that might be of interest is something called 'proximity effect' which is when a sound source gets louder as it gets closer to a solid surface. Put your face 1 inch from a wall and speak to test this out.
The law is that each surface at 90 degrees multiplies the volume by 3db, ie:
1 wall adds 3db, 2 walls meeting in a corner adds 6db and a corner where 2 walls and a floor/ceiling meet adds 9db. Think about that when placing the sub. It can work for you or against you.

Last thing, mostly subs are meant to be felt, not heard hence the word 'sub'. This reflects reproduction of natural sounds or acoustic and amplified instruments. Depending on the music you make, and testing your reference material against other systems, you can usually adjust your sub to taste without much worry.

Enjoy your sub.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:46 am 

Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2006 6:32 am
Posts: 1272
Location: Colorado Springs, USA
Excellent Advice.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 11:50 am 

Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 83
Definitely excellent advice...thanks! That is exactly what I'm doing!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 2:59 pm 

Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 7:26 pm
Posts: 177
Location: Austin, Texas
Rogue Scrunt wrote:
Audio guys usually say.

Don't bother with a sub, unless your room is tuned(treated) well


how can you make dance/electronic music without a sub?? The bass is so important to us.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:11 pm 

Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2006 6:32 am
Posts: 1272
Location: Colorado Springs, USA
teknobryan wrote:
Rogue Scrunt wrote:
Audio guys usually say.

Don't bother with a sub, unless your room is tuned(treated) well


how can you make dance/electronic music without a sub?? The bass is so important to us.


I'm just going off what I read in TapeOp magazine.

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 Post subject: Re: Setting up a subwoofer...
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:29 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 9:57 am
Posts: 56
Location: Oslo, Norway
Steve Christian wrote:
Ok, so I recently got a sub ( Tannoy TS-8 ) and I've got a few questions about setup.

1. With the crossover switch at 150hz on the sub, should I kill everything below 150hz on my monitors so it's a clean 150 and below on the sub and 150 on up on the monitors?

2. Is it best to place the sub dead center underneath my studio desk? If not dead center, should the sub at least always be placed at ground level?

3. Currently I have the Tannoy Active nearfield monitors with the 6.5 inch woofer. Should I go with the 10 inch sub as opposed to the 8inch? Any help would be greatly appreciated! I guess I should also note that the studio is a small 10x10 room.


Any help our direction would be greatly appreciated!



1. If you leave the same frequencies in your monitors, you could experience phase errors.
If your sub has a phase adjustment, you could adjust that and almost elimiate phase errors.
Still, isn't 150Hz a bit high for the crossover?

Well, anyways, although in some cases if would sound better with not cutting the crossover frequencies in your monitor, I would suggest starting with cutting, and, if you miss something, try not cutting.

If you don't have a phase adjustment knob on the sub, I would suggest to cut.


2. Put it on the floor. Usually it would be a good idea to have the sub in the middle.
However, in a small room, because of the wave-lenghts of low frequencies, I would suggest trying it in a corner.

Also:
The thing with a sub-bass, or any bass in a room, is that usually it is difficult to make a large sweetspot.

3. I would suggest, get a large one, maybe you will have a bigger room at another time.
You need a big speaker to make the lowest waves.
Check the specs, I would suggest getting one that goes down to 22-23Hz, and I guess you will need a 12 inch sub for that.

Hepha Luemp

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:44 pm 

Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2004 3:12 pm
Posts: 8800
Location: www.fridge.net.au
not a rule of thumb, but in both a treated and untreated small studio, I have found a good response by putting the sub against the wall to your right and a little bit behind the mixing position.

i face the woofer towards some dampening furniture (in my studio a leather couch).

yeah once again, in a few little studio's ive use a sub, this position has worked pretty well!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 12:19 am 

Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2006 3:51 am
Posts: 19
Location: From Paris in Amsterdam
i'm using a subwoofer and put the frequency on 83htz, NOT TOO LOUD, very soft, just to help for the bass precence... othewise you gonna put down your bass in you mix....
if that can help :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 1:58 am 

Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 83
Ok, I think I've learned a few things since getting it (probably should have figured this out beforehand but I'm impulsive :lol: ). I realized my Tannoy monitors go down to 62Hz so I've set the sub up to roll off around 75Hz which sounds good with the monitors. I've actually got the sub placed against the left wall about 4.5 feet away and slightly behind me. Right now this sounds waaaay better then just the monitors and is a world of difference when it comes to composing, but in a good way. It's one thing to assume what that lowend's gonna feel/sound like, but it's a whole other thing to actually feel it kick in when you do it right. I used to spend quite a bit of time on the lowend, but I can see things will become much easier when I click it on and begin to work out levels. I'm sure I'm going to realize I need to make a few more adjustments before it's as good as it can be in my room, but I'll never go back to writing music without it. Anyone against having a sub I'd definitely recommend giving it a listen in a studio while working before disregarding it as unnecessary.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 2:03 am 

Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 3:26 am
Posts: 300
Location: Toronto Ont. Canada
Yeah, it's one thing to think or talk about what WILL and WON'T work when dealing with sound. But the important thing is whether it DOES or DOESN'T when you actually try it. Sometimes we forget that fact in our discussions.


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