where do I go from here?

Discussion of music production, audio, equipment and any related topics, either with or without Ableton Live
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noisetonepause
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where do I go from here?

Post by noisetonepause » Mon Dec 01, 2003 9:35 pm

So I has the 8 bars down. I've done my drumloop chopping like I do, it's good. I got a Satie piano sample sounding like... well... something good. It's good.

So I sit and I stare.

*bleh*

We've all been there - God knows I've been there a few times this week already, I'm just out of ideas; tell me what to do with it. 8 Bars of drum'n'piano at 160 BPM, what do I do?

On a similar note, anybody up for some collaborations? I think I need to spar with somebody... I've got webspace; we could just toss selfcontained Live-sets, .zipped around.

-Paws
Suit #1: I mean, have you got any insight as to why a bright boy like this would jeopardize the lives of millions?
Suit #2: No, sir, he says he does this sort of thing for fun.

gaspode
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Howdy

Post by gaspode » Mon Dec 01, 2003 10:49 pm

If you're looking for some collaborative experimentation I'd be willing to give it a try. Send me an email with some thoughts/ideas of styles... how you'd like the collab process to work... etc and I'll see what I can do...

Later,

Greg

14 Monkeys in Prostration

Post by 14 Monkeys in Prostration » Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:03 pm

To begin with, you might want to develop those 8 bar patterns into an evolving structure. Not to limit your creative potential, but it's rare to hear a track begin with rhythmic and melodic components blaring away off the bat - better to choose one to begin with and then develop the other into the overall composition.

So, that can stretch things out about 32-44 bars (ish). Maybe, through the course of developing this passge, you'll stumble across some ideas in creating alternate passages to fit in, cut in, or work around what you've already created.

Try mucking around with the samples until you get some permutations of those drums and melody, save those off to the side to be brought in and developed into changes later on. Play with it, make noise (and maybe even change the tempo).

Btw - on the NI reaktor forum, did you post something about modern classical music being far more of a headphuque then autechre or radio head? Care to share some composers names? The last classical composers I've gotten into were the early electronic pioneers (mortin subotnik, the concrete kids, john cage, stockhausen, etc). Well, philip glass is known to me, but who else should I be checking out (and you mean in structure, not timbre, correct)?

noisetonepause
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Post by noisetonepause » Mon Dec 01, 2003 11:28 pm

Gaspode - you have mail.

14 Monkeys are telling me how to write music. This is a strange day indeed. ;)

New Classical music. Structure, Timbre. I dunno. Both, I suppose; I try to analyse as little as possible when I listen, and just flow with it... There's Philip Glass, as you say - check out Music in 12 Parts, especially; I like his 70's stuff more than what he's done later on. His string quartets as recorded by Kronos are divine, IMHO. Get your hands on anything by Steve Reich, LaMonte Young, Terry Riley, if you like that minimalist, "notescape" thing. Arvo Pärt does some extremely beautiful yet... weird... things as well, as does John Adams; Else there's Henryk Gorecki, though I'm not too fond of him myself. And you might wanna check out my countryman Per Nørgaard who writes some very interesting symphones. There's a lot of wank in 'new music', but there's a lot of class too.

-Paws
Suit #1: I mean, have you got any insight as to why a bright boy like this would jeopardize the lives of millions?
Suit #2: No, sir, he says he does this sort of thing for fun.

tjwett
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Post by tjwett » Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:33 am

160 BPM eh? well whenever i'm stuck on a d n' b tune i always go with the "old standby" and start the track with 4 or 8 bars of 16th or 32nd note hi-hats, build up a nice pad and bassline, then kick in the melody and drums and see what happens. that's taken right from the LTJ Bukem drum n' bass-to-english dictionary, pretty foolproof. ;)

dirtystudios
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Post by dirtystudios » Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:46 am

i'm down for some collaboration. maybe take a crack at that piano thing.

email me if you're interested.

k

ethios4

modern composers

Post by ethios4 » Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:55 am

on the 20th C. composers tip...
i dig Charles Ives for the ideas of simultaneity in soundscapes, as well as microtonality and multiple tempos at once...
Conlon Nancarrow did some real cool stuff with modified player pianos - multiple tempos at once, microtonality, etc..
Harry Partch was into creating totally new acoustic instruments, with entirely different tuning systems and such...
Milton Babbit has some super-intellectual proto-electronic stuff with tape loops, and hand sequenced analog synth craziness. I used a sample from "Philomel" in a track that worked really well...atonal soprano line with seemingly random synth beeps behind it. Jacob Druckman was similarly into human/pre-recorded tape interaction...
it's amazing what lengths people used to have to go to to do what we can do instantly with Live :) musique concrete enjoy...

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