Mastering Roll Off

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xxxmorphicxxx
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Mastering Roll Off

Post by xxxmorphicxxx » Sun Jun 10, 2007 1:44 am

For those of you who do mastering on your own, I need advice...

Which frequencies would you recommend rolling off on your EQ on the master track?

I've read 30hz, and I've heard 50hz. Specifically, I'm asking for rock style music, with light use of synths and electronic drums.

Please advise.

nebulae
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Post by nebulae » Sun Jun 10, 2007 7:26 pm

Between 20 and 60 hz depending on what you hear. If I'm at a bass-heavy club, I tend to run an EQ with a 40-50hz rolloff. If mastering for regular CD or mp3, I usually keep it around 30hz.

This is definitely program dependent too. And I'll also tell you that it's not necessarily the case that rock music doesn't have a low bottom end....there are a ton of bass drum and bass frequencies hiding in the bottom end that can cause phase cancellation and muddiness issues. My suggestion is to use a roll-off EQ on your bass and bass kick tracks, do side-chaining compression between the bass and the kick, and then in your master, roll-off again around 30hz.

franknputer
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Post by franknputer » Sun Jun 10, 2007 9:34 pm

I think you should really just listen while you move the low frequency point up until you hear it change, then see where you're at. If you're doing rock, you're not likely to have a lot below 50 Hz anyway, but you might lose some punch.

Dunno if I'd roll off the bass & kick, unless there's an obvious issue - and if you do that, a roll-off of the entire mix may be redundant (although it shouldn't hurt anything).

Michael-SW
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Post by Michael-SW » Sun Jun 10, 2007 9:53 pm

Also, there will a huge difference if you use a 6db filter compared to a 48 db filter. So it is not really relevant to talk about a roll off point in general. The steeper the filter, the lower the roll off.

elektrovert
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Post by elektrovert » Mon Jun 11, 2007 8:56 am

nebulae wrote:Between 20 and 60 hz depending on what you hear. If I'm at a bass-heavy club, I tend to run an EQ with a 40-50hz rolloff. If mastering for regular CD or mp3, I usually keep it around 30hz.

This is on top of the roll off you might apply to individual elements during mixing?
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nebulae
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Post by nebulae » Mon Jun 11, 2007 12:05 pm

elektrovert wrote:
nebulae wrote:Between 20 and 60 hz depending on what you hear. If I'm at a bass-heavy club, I tend to run an EQ with a 40-50hz rolloff. If mastering for regular CD or mp3, I usually keep it around 30hz.

This is on top of the roll off you might apply to individual elements during mixing?
Yes. It's one of the best tips I got from a BT video I saw a while back. He says that he uses EQs to shelve frequencies as much as possible on a per-track basis so that there are no hidden frequencies, and then he does a roll-off on the mastering process as well. Makes for some very tight mixes that sound well-produced.

elektrovert
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Post by elektrovert » Mon Jun 11, 2007 1:25 pm

good stuff!

I'll give that a go so, I've a live gig coming up and I've previously had low end problems with my mixes so I'm doing everything in my power to sort that out before that.

I've become very fond of my high pass eq's lately. :D
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Khazul
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Post by Khazul » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:34 pm

A really common problem I have found with DJs is when in a venue where the PA systemn doesnt have quite enough grunt, they carry on cranking up the volume and particualarly the bass... until you get to the point where everything just farts... - horrible.

Allways fun when you take over the EQ controls on their mixer drop the bass drastically and then suddenly the lost punch comes back and theyre happy again... if also a little puzzled...

(BTW - only do this to a DJ if your allready are associated with the venue or production - else they do get quite pissed off - lol).

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Post by laird » Mon Jun 11, 2007 5:06 pm

One of the other reasons to do this is that some DSP processes can induce a DC offset. I think with live's 32bit processing this isn't so much an issue...
anyhow, rolling off anything below 20 hz will remove LFO/DC offset problems caused by too much DSP.

And as Michael-SW mentioned, depneding on the steepness of the filter you use, you might set your HP filter to 30hz or 60hz, just to make sure you are really cutting out all the sub-audible frequency garbage... but not so high that you are removing too much lovely sub-bass.

Anyhow, rather than zoom to a level where I can possibly see a LFO/DC offset problem and decide whether I need to fix it or not (your waveforms aren't centered around the zero/middle, but instead are centered at a level above or below, meaning they hit the top but not the bottom (or visa versa)... I just high-pass filter my master above 20 or 30 hz as a matter of habit.

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