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newbie reflections.

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 4:23 pm
by vilu
So I'm currently trying to get the hang of Ableton and I think im starting to have a basic idea about the different concepts of Ableton. Anyway my real question playing around with this I start to question myself where the line goes, when am I considered creating music and when am I just pussling together other peoples sounds?

For example I remember my little brother being younger and using hiphop/dance Ejay to make music. He could get things to sound decent but still it just looked like puzzling together pieces of music to me.

Now im using ableton and with all the presets I can do the same thing basically . I can take the premade drumkits etc. and puzzle something decent together.

Im not sure that im being clear but hopefully someone will understand me.

And the follow up question, I want to create everything from scratch. Where can i find basic music theory, and tips how to make a typical snare / kick / etc sound?

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 4:41 pm
by Bierman
from a drum programming perspective, you'll get plenty of help and tips from ppl, (particularly me) but you'd need to be a bit more specific about what you're after first.

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 5:08 pm
by vilu
actually I dont really have a clear idea of what I need to learn. What I feel im missing the most now is basic music theory. For example, if I want to make a hiphop beat, what is it that makes a hiphop beat a hiphop beat? What makes reggae? Now it feels like I only make typical techno tracks.

And how do I make sounds that I can consider my sounds? For example with operator ive managed to make kicks and thats cool. Basically I want to learn more about sound engineering, make up a sound in my head then make it real. Not just change parameters and MAYBE stumble upon a cool sound

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 6:04 pm
by Seyser Koze
You need to master the cowbell first, everything else is secondary. :D

Are you going to make Reggae or Hip Hop?

make the music you like to make. if you like Hip Hop you;ll have listened to enough of it to know what you like and how it sounds. Then you need to try and emulate those sounds.

At the same time you need to try and build the knowledge on drum sounds, within Live and in general, how to make the kick kick, hos tio get your cymbals shiny, how to get things sounding the way you want.

then you need a good sprinkling of your own creativity...withouth that you'll just be reshuffling other poeoples ideas.

Presets are presets, tweak them.

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 6:17 pm
by gjm
Live is only a tool. Your personal ability to use the tool to make music is in direct proportion to your exposure to musical training(amoungst other first hand musical experiences) as opposed to your skills in software operation.
vilu wrote:
actually I dont really have a clear idea of what I need to learn. What I feel im missing the most now is basic music theory. For example, if I want to make a hiphop beat, what is it that makes a hiphop beat a hiphop beat? What makes reggae? Now it feels like I only make typical techno tracks.
You should take drum lessons for a year. Find a music teacher who will show you what makes up these beats, learn to play them with your body, then you will have no trouble using Live the Tool to make the beats you want.

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:00 pm
by Action Jackson
What is your problem exactly? As far as I know, you learn sound design by trial and error, if you know what you want and try to produce the sounds you want. There's no such thing as a tutorial on how to produce the perfect hip hop kick or a reggae snare (if there ever was one?). Just see what you can come up with on your own. If you can't achieve what you want, use samples.

Posted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:16 pm
by Akshara
Howard Goodall's How Music Works - this is a 4 part TV series uploaded to Stage 6 which offers an overview of basic music theory.

Gateway To Rhythm by John McLaughlin and S. Ganesh Vinayakram - This DVD teaches a system of rhythm called Konokol. It's an accessible and fun tutorial which doesn't require that one be a drummer or percussionist, and the theory presented can be applied to any musical genre. There's a lofi demo video at YouTube.