[ot]sci-fi, good book -- any you like?

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Precision
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Post by Precision » Tue Mar 04, 2008 5:54 pm

"This is the Way the World Ends" by James Morrow. Great book, but incredibly bleak, so don't read it if you want cheering up!
Tone Deft wrote: it's hard to code Python when you're knocked up on morphine with your dick in a sling.

mikemc
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Post by mikemc » Tue Mar 04, 2008 5:55 pm

ethios4 wrote: I've been wanting to read Dhalgren by Samuel Delany for awhile.
This is one of the strangest, most amazing books i've ever read. Jarring scenes, almost no easily encapsulated story line, set in this amazingly structured and detailed alternate world-in-an-anonymous-midsized-city.

Here's as close as I can come to a sunopsis: something similar to what happened in New Orleans happened in this city, only not with water but with 'some other force', most of the people are gone, no explanation as to where or why, but somehow there are substantial supplies of food, along with normal as well as bizarre consumer goods that have become oddly popular. The people that are left just live there, and it's all as told from the viewpoint of an amnesiac.

chrysalis33rpm
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Post by chrysalis33rpm » Tue Mar 04, 2008 6:03 pm

ethios4 wrote:
pulsoc wrote:"Valis" or any other by Phil K Dick

I have found the short stories anthologies (annual Best of's) to usually have some really good stuff.
Which would you recommend? I've been wanting to read some of his short stories lately, and maybe even try to apapt one into a live set. "Flow My Tears the Policeman Said" had a profound effect on me I can't quite describe.

I've been wanting to read Dhalgren by Samuel Delany for awhile.

+1 to Gibson, Dick, and Asimov.

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is incredible, though not strictly sci-fi.
Why on earth is HHG not sci-fi? Because its funny? But I agree, its incredible- and poignant, if you dig into it a bit. A very good film adaptation as well I feel.

Well, lets see. Gibson, Dick, and Asimov are pillars, yes. (All Tomorrows Parties by Gibson didn't get mentioned- it's my favorite!) Dune by Frank Herbert is also essential and excellent, although the movies have been less than great.

But the latest greatest sci-fi IMO is the Hyperion series by Dan Simmons. Really vibrant and compelling imagery, imagination, and adventure.

Haven't read the new Gibson yet. Pattern Recognition was quite good but not mind blowing like some of his works (Mona Lisa Overdrive comes to mind).

Tone Deft
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Post by Tone Deft » Tue Mar 04, 2008 6:24 pm

Snow Crash

Isaac Asimov

Ray Bradbury

2001, 2010

+1 on Gibson and Douglas Adams
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chrysalis33rpm
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Post by chrysalis33rpm » Tue Mar 04, 2008 6:45 pm

Oh yeah, Neil Stephenson!!! (Snow Crash)

This book is the most realizable presentation of virtual reality I've ever read, as well as being an interesting look at the parallels between language and viruses. Also a very fun read.

And his Cryptonomicon is a demonstration of the development of digital technologies out of encryption techniques, and gives a decent understanding of the fundamental functioning of a computer.

maze23a
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Post by maze23a » Tue Mar 04, 2008 7:03 pm

I just tried to read"Qual" by Greg Egan but it felt like
you have to Study bio and physics to read!

epiphanius
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Post by epiphanius » Tue Mar 04, 2008 7:23 pm

Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge.
Also, the Phillip Pullman books (Golden Compass), are almost, technically scifi, more fantasy, but very nicely written.

Stand on Zanzibar is another worthy Brunner book.

And, anything by Phillip K. Dick.


e.

Angstrom
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Post by Angstrom » Tue Mar 04, 2008 7:33 pm

maze23a wrote:I just tried to read"Qual" by Greg Egan but it felt like
you have to Study bio and physics to read!
Quarantine is much more approachable.

frahnque
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Re: [ot]sci-fi, good book -- any you like?

Post by frahnque » Tue Mar 04, 2008 7:34 pm

mikemc wrote:'The Sheep Look Up" by John Brunner, I read this a long while ago, and it made quite an impression on me, and sad to say that current events remind me more and more of it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sheep_Look_Up

any sci-fi you like?
Judging by what's said about this book on wikipedia. I would really recommend you to read my favourite book (I recommended it in this thread but I'll do it again). It's post-apocalypse deluxe (futuristic, yet close):
"Roadside Picninc" by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky.

Tarkovskijs move Stalker is based (to some extent atleast) upon this book.

For some reason, there's a PDF of it using this google search
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls= ... +picnic%22

(see 3 hits down)
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Pitch Black
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Post by Pitch Black » Tue Mar 04, 2008 8:04 pm

Vercengetorex wrote:"The Stars My Destination" by Alfred Bester. First published in 1956, its old Sci-Fi that will easily stand up to any contemporary authors works. Just thinking about it makes me want to read it again!
+1!

William Gibson calls TSMD his favourite sci-fi novel, and his biggest influence. What more do you need?

ethios4
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Post by ethios4 » Tue Mar 04, 2008 9:37 pm

chrysalis33rpm wrote:Why on earth is HHG not sci-fi?
Haha, yea I don't know why I said that...
HHG shaped my thinking in a lot of ways. I always carry a towel when traveling, and its come in useful sooo many times!

pixelmechanic
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Post by pixelmechanic » Tue Mar 04, 2008 9:48 pm

The Forever War - Joe Haldeman (also Forever Peace & Forever Free are OK)
pixelmechanic - sound vs. vision - appropriation vs. improvisation

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debu
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Post by debu » Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:27 am

mix of various short stories, author blew my head off.

http://www.amazon.com/Stories-Your-Life ... 887&sr=8-1

gjm
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Post by gjm » Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:50 am

ethios4 wrote:
chrysalis33rpm wrote:Why on earth is HHG not sci-fi?
Haha, yea I don't know why I said that...
HHG shaped my thinking in a lot of ways. I always carry a towel when traveling, and its come in useful sooo many times!
Don't forget 'The Resturant at the end of the Universe' by the same author, Douglas Adams. Something about the subtle 'piss take' on intellegence and the fate of earth that really tickled me :lol:
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SimonPHC
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Post by SimonPHC » Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:51 am

Atypical wrote:His latest, Spook Country is awesome: sci-fi, but set in today's reality. brilliant stuff.
In an interview he mentioned that writing sci-fi in this day and age has become somewhat irrelevant. The world as it is, is so virtualized already, that constructing other worlds or ages is just not necessary, the times have caught up with our ability to think about the future. we live in a perpetual, virtual now.

or something like that at least, but with better words :wink:

he also mentioned he likes belgians, cause we're a mix between romance and germanic culture. that's bound to give some interesting collisions :lol:

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