how to mix distorted guitars with dubstep basses and beats?

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big303
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how to mix distorted guitars with dubstep basses and beats?

Post by big303 » Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:11 am

im in the middle of panic, how to mix or which frequencies to cut on guitars when mixing them with electronic beats and basses?

Vios
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Re: how to mix distorted guitars with dubstep basses and beats?

Post by Vios » Sun Nov 04, 2012 2:28 am

Frequency sweep your guitars with +6-10db boost and a Q of 1.0. Find the frequency which sounds like it carries the bulk of the guitar's sound. Cut this frequency on your dubstep basslines. Boost this frequency very mildly on your guitars. Electric distorted guitars often sound good when primarily "placed" at 2-5kHz.


simmerdown
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Re: how to mix distorted guitars with dubstep basses and beats?

Post by simmerdown » Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:47 am

dont panic! KEEP IT TOGETHER MAN (slap slap)

big303
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Re: how to mix distorted guitars with dubstep basses and beats?

Post by big303 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:16 am

heheh, im trying, trying .

so as i understood , i have as well to cut all bass frequencies from guitar?
and add some presence at hier end?

Vios
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Re: how to mix distorted guitars with dubstep basses and beats?

Post by Vios » Tue Nov 06, 2012 3:27 pm

Equalization is more about making room for a sound by cutting the frequencies on other parts in a particular frequency spectrum than boosting a part to make it stick out.

It's like if you're a teacher and everyone in the class is talking. It's a lot more effective to get everyone quiet and then start explaining than it is to shout over everyone.

Think about dividing the 20-20000Hz into bands and make each part 'fit' a different band. This is done mostly by cutting other instruments out of that band and then by boosting mildly in that band.

Think like this (for example):

Kick: 50-70Hz
Bass: 70-150Hz
Pads: 150-700Hz
Voice: 700-3000Hz
Guitar:3000-7000Hz
High Hats:7000-20000Hz

Each part has its own frequency space. That doesn't mean that these are the only frequencies that these instruments produce, but it's where the bulk on their sound is, and therefore you'll help them stick out in a mix while still sounding good by using equalization to isolate them (a bit) into those bands.

Boost mildly in the band the instrument is in, but mostly you want to cut instruments in the frequency bands they're not in, so that it opens up space for the other instruments and drums in your track. This is basic mixing equalization theory.

Granted, everything in moderation. Overdoing frequency isolation will make parts sound hollow. Underdoing it will your mixes muddy.

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